Provost’s Colloquium Series Finishes Semester with The Expat: A History of Posting American Employees in Germany in the Post-Cold War Era

Posted by: Elizabeth Richardson on April 14, 2017, One Comment

As part of the East Stroudsburg University Spring 2017 Provost’s Colloquium Series, Christopher Brooks, Dr. phil., associate professor of history, will give a talk titled The Expat: A History of Posting American Employees in Germany in the Post-Cold War Era, on April 19 in Beers Lecture Hall at 5:30 p.m.

Dr. Brooks will discuss his book Expats in Germany – Inbound and Outbound: Questions Frequently Asked by Foreigners, published by DeGrutyer, which will be on book shelves this month together with another project titled “The Expat: A History of Posting American Employees in Germany in the Post-Cold War Era.” He will talk about the experiences American expats working in Germany had after the reduction in American military presence that coincided with the Cold War’s end. He’ll touch upon the commonly held belief that the drawdown of U.S. troops led to Americans being treated less fairly in the German workplace. His findings challenged his preliminary hypothesis.

Implemented by ESU Provost Joanne Bruno, J.D., the Provost’s Colloquium Series is designed to create an intellectual experience that promotes dialogue among faculty, staff, students and the community through a series of events highlighting developments in all disciplines and professions. This is the final presentation in the ESU Spring 2017 Provost’s Colloquium Series.  A new lineup of lectures will be launched in the fall.

For more information about the Provost’s Colloquium Series, contact Christina McDonald, director, office of sponsored projects and research, at (570) 422-7954 or cmcdonald9@esu.edu.



One Response to “Provost’s Colloquium Series Finishes Semester with The Expat: A History of Posting American Employees in Germany in the Post-Cold War Era”


Rhonda Miller

Posted April 14, 2017 at 9:00 PM

Congrats, Dr. Brooks, on your recent publication! Sounds like a fascinating study.